archiemcphee:

This awesomely large and intricate wooden sculpture is the work of Chinese artist Zheng Chunhui. Carved on a 40-foot-long tree trunk over the course of 4 years, this monumental work of art was recently recognized by Guinness World Records as the world’s longest continuous wooden sculpture.

Zheng Chunhui’s sculpture is based on a famous Chinese painting called Along the River During the Qingming Festival. The Qingming Festival is, “a historical holiday reserved to celebrate past ancestors that falls on the 104th day after the winter solstice.

Photos by Lv Ming, click here to view more.

[via Colossal]

Reblogged from whatthecool

jtotheizzoe:

beatricebiologist:

This isn’t the first time I’ve found a grey hair with a brown root. Yes, the hair follicle decided to start producing brown hair again, and not because I’m a wizard or Benjamin Button, but because hair follicles just get indecisive as they age. Here’s a full explanation.

Since I still possess 100% grey-free blonde hair, I was not aware that this could happen. But the explanation is pretty cool. It’s basically your colored hair follicles last gasps of youth.
Anyone have these reverse-colored partial-greys on their head?

jtotheizzoe:

beatricebiologist:

This isn’t the first time I’ve found a grey hair with a brown root. Yes, the hair follicle decided to start producing brown hair again, and not because I’m a wizard or Benjamin Button, but because hair follicles just get indecisive as they age. Here’s a full explanation.

Since I still possess 100% grey-free blonde hair, I was not aware that this could happen. But the explanation is pretty cool. It’s basically your colored hair follicles last gasps of youth.

Anyone have these reverse-colored partial-greys on their head?

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

Here’s some patriotic prokaryotes to wish you a happy 4th of July full of luminescent liberty!
These light-producing bacteria, known as Photobacterium leiognathi, are ocean-dwelling symbionts, bacteria that live on or within animals, getting protection from their hosts and giving them light-producing tissues in return. 
The anglerfish's glowing bait? That's bioluminescent bacteria. Same with the lanternfish, and certain glowing jellies. 
Thanks for the fireworks, nature!
(via Microbes Rule and Beatrice the Biologist)

jtotheizzoe:

Here’s some patriotic prokaryotes to wish you a happy 4th of July full of luminescent liberty!

These light-producing bacteria, known as Photobacterium leiognathi, are ocean-dwelling symbionts, bacteria that live on or within animals, getting protection from their hosts and giving them light-producing tissues in return. 

The anglerfish's glowing bait? That's bioluminescent bacteria. Same with the lanternfish, and certain glowing jellies. 

Thanks for the fireworks, nature!

(via Microbes Rule and Beatrice the Biologist)

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

ucresearch:

An invisible force at the center of our galaxy
Scientists have theorized that our Milky Way galaxy has a super massive black hole at the center of it, but how did this idea come about?  How do astronomers measure something that has actually never been seen in our telescopes?
Above is an animation of star movements in our galaxy over the past 16 years.  They all orbit around a point that emits no light in our galaxy.  We can measure the mass of these stars and calculate that their orbits require an object with the mass of 4 million Suns.  So far this points to a super massive black hole in our galaxy.
Read more about how galaxies obtain these supermassive objects →

The nothing made of something at the center of everything…
This headline got me thinking… is there a force that is not invisible? I mean we’re all comfortable with the idea that gravity, magnetism, and electrical forces are invisible. We can see their effects, but you can’t point to a force.
Even when it comes to tension, friction, or applied force, we always discuss the effects of the force when we discuss them. The force itself is not a thing that we can point to or see. Even pushing a chair across a room, if we could zoom into the atoms of my hand pressing near the atoms of the chair, we would ultimately see nothing there, just space. The electrons in my hand are in an odd sense “aware” of the electrons in the chair, and they repulse each other, due to electromagnetic force (also invisible) and the exclusion principle.
So really, isn’t all force invisible? Someone call Yoda.

jtotheizzoe:

ucresearch:

An invisible force at the center of our galaxy


Scientists have theorized that our Milky Way galaxy has a super massive black hole at the center of it, but how did this idea come about?  How do astronomers measure something that has actually never been seen in our telescopes?

Above is an animation of star movements in our galaxy over the past 16 years.  They all orbit around a point that emits no light in our galaxy.  We can measure the mass of these stars and calculate that their orbits require an object with the mass of 4 million Suns.  So far this points to a super massive black hole in our galaxy.

Read more about how galaxies obtain these supermassive objects →

The nothing made of something at the center of everything…

This headline got me thinking… is there a force that is not invisible? I mean we’re all comfortable with the idea that gravity, magnetism, and electrical forces are invisible. We can see their effects, but you can’t point to a force.

Even when it comes to tension, friction, or applied force, we always discuss the effects of the force when we discuss them. The force itself is not a thing that we can point to or see. Even pushing a chair across a room, if we could zoom into the atoms of my hand pressing near the atoms of the chair, we would ultimately see nothing there, just space. The electrons in my hand are in an odd sense “aware” of the electrons in the chair, and they repulse each other, due to electromagnetic force (also invisible) and the exclusion principle.

So really, isn’t all force invisible? Someone call Yoda.

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe